In With Beyonce’s Costumes And Out With DJ Alan Freed’s Ashes

Beyonce-hall-of-fame

(PCM) It is this type of story that just gets under my skin. It has recently been reported that The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio has opened up a new exhibit featuring many costumes and other memorabilia from Beyonce.

However, as they were rolling in Beyonce’s many costumes, including the black leotard featured in her 2008 hit video for “Single Ladies”, one piece of true rock n’ roll memorabilia was being ushered out.

The urn containing the ashes of the late DJ Alan Freed was removed from the museum just days before the Beyonce exhibit was set to open. In case you were wondering, Freed is the man who is credited with coining the actual term “rock n’ roll”.  His ashes were placed in the Hall Of Fame about 12 years ago.

According to CNN.com “Freed started playing R&B records on his Cleveland radio show in 1951, a time when stations that targeted white listeners ignored black artists. He called it ‘rock ‘n’ roll. His ‘Moondog Coronation Ball’ at the Cleveland Arena in March 1956 is considered the first major rock concert.”

Why in the world the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame would feel the need to remove such a significant piece of rock n’ roll history is beyond me.  When asked for a comment about the removal of Freed’s ashes, the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame’s executive director claimed “Rock n’ roll isn’t just about yesterday. It continues to evolve, and we continue to embrace it and refine our operations.”

My argument is that you are a museum that showcases rock n’ roll history. While yes, I can agree that history is always being written, we certainly don’t want those that helped pave the way to be forgotten. It is more of a matter of respect than evolution.

Freed’s family are in search of a new place to keep the urn and allow fans to pay their respects.

 

Did you like this? Share it:

We Are The Riot Debut New Music Video

We-Are-The-Riot

(PCM) Los Angeles based Hard Rock band We Are The Riot (featuring Meegs Rascon & Mikal Cox of Coal Chamber and Andy Cole ex-Static-X) have released the official music video for their track “It’s Not What You Wanted.”

“It’s Not What You Wanted” is the first release from the band’s new EP (available now), and they will be heading into the studio this November to record a full length album.

We are definitely digging the video, which was produced by Brian Cox at Digital Iris and was filmed at the Salton Sea near Palm Springs, California.

It is always a pleasure to see a music video that is put together like a mini-movie and the band has done a phenomenal job. We definitely look forward to hearing more!

Did you like this? Share it:

The Bolts Transformation Into Island Apollo At Silverlake Lounge

By: Lucy rendler-Kaplan

Island-Apollo2

(PCM) Orange-County based indie rockers The Bolts made a bold move early last month—they changed their name to Island Apollo. Bolder still, the five-some headed north to hipster haven Silverlake  previewing work through their new material as Island Apollo, taking up residency at the gritty Silverlake Lounge for four Mondays in July.

The band—comprised of guitarists Heath Farmer and Ryan Kilpatrick, bassist Addam Farmer, keyboardist Austin Farmer, and drummer Matt Champagne—gained considerable fame as The Bolts after forming as teenagers in Orange County.  In short order, they picked up airplay on KROQ, won Orange County’s “Best Pop Artist” from the OC Music Awards, opened for Capital Cities and Third Eye Blind, appeared across local TV and, realizing every young man’s dream, had a song placed in a commercial featuring supermodel Kate Upton.

At Silverlake Lounge, the group took the stage as relative newcomers.

From the first show through the last, Island Apollo was not what you’d call tentative.  Despite the new name (coined for the artificial islands in Long Beach Bay, each named for a Apollo astronaut) and brand new material, they couldn’t shake off (nor should they) the experience of seven years playing together.  Island Apollo plays with astonishing precision and considerable verve. They’re tight but not tense, intense but not intimidating. Each member knows their job and does it well, and their experience shines through in confident assured playing, compact, well-crafted songs, and at the bottom of each, Matt Champagne: throwing himself all over his small drum kit (with one synth pad, he’s quick to point out), each bang of the drums exuberant—at times it seems he just might freak out—before bringing the beats back to their “proper” place.   In fact, each song finishes a little sooner than you think it should.  A few of the songs hint at what might be in store if they were to shake off the disciplined structure and show fans what it might feel like to be invited into one of their private jam sessions.  Watching the crowd, it was clear that each song left the audience wanting more.

Island-Apollo1

If one is to believe the set lists (show-goers eagerly snatched from under Heath’s feet at the end of each gig) during the Silverlake Lounge residencies consisted of eight-song sets of original compositions the band has been working on for inclusion into their first EP as Island Apollo. He told the audience, “We think Animal is going to be our fist single, but our manager (Dan Catullo, of Orange County production powerhouse DC3 Music/City Drive Entertainment) asked us not to confirm that.”  Regardless, our money’s on Animal—it’s a self-effacing excuse for love and lust, delivered with Ryan and Heath’s guitars over urgent, insistent, almost drill-cadence harmonies.

Heath and Ryan trade lead and rhythm guitar duties effortlessly, going back and forth between parts without looking at each other. Heath wields a well-worn Telecaster, showing years of love and long use along with that very sweet, country punk-tinged sound; he expands on its single pickup design and sound with an array of pedals and effects at his feet that makes the gear lovers in the audience crane their necks over the monitors to look at it.

Ryan, Island Apollo’s newly appointed lead vocalist, croons a fine tenor over his Stratocaster, fixing his gaze on the audience as he works through the tunes. Their intention was to have Ryan handle all the singing—thinking perhaps their four-part harmonies as the Bolts too lightweight—but they simply can’t help harmonizing, and you can tell they clearly relish singing together. Each song’s chorus is fist-to-the gut punchy. They pack a pop and a wallop.  This is especially evident on the tunes Phoenix and Animal.

Between them is Addam, alternately strumming and plucking his bass—just like the guitarists on either side of them. Twice during the residency, he sported a black t-shirt with dinosaurs on it, and the irony wasn’t lost on fans of Animal.

Habitual starts with a looser, free-form instrumental intro reminiscent of The War on Drugs—but again, tantalizingly brief.  In Meaning of Love, the guys sing, “You build me up/And break me down/That’s the meaning of love/That’s the meaning of love.” It is then that you realize: these guys are not punks; they really are a bunch of Orange County lads, tanned, fresh-faced, and very outgoing.  They want us to like them, and y’know what? We do.  The band reads the audience well and knows that they won’t win us over if they sing at us to fuck off.  It’s refreshingly…fresh.  At each week of the residency, a tanned, teeming crowd of young ladies in the audience undoubtedly seemed to agree.

Believer is as close as these guys come to down-tempo in the Silverlake sets, a minor-key anthem driven by Austin’s low-key keys, his extensive rig anchored by a Yamaha electric piano. In I Don’t Need Your Kind of Love, they build guitar energy with staccato guitar riffs around their vocal, ensemble playing holding Champagne’s drums in check, concluding with soulful, tight harmonies on Think it Over, their last number.

Heath explains their carefully constructed set after the show.  “We believe that every song should flow naturally and that every detail should serve an artistic purpose. We added tempo changes where it made sense, and explored varying chord progressions.”  As you watch his fingers fly up and down the fret board, you realize he’s taking his own advice well.

Island Apollo’s next gig is Thursday, August 14 at a new venue downtown: Downstairs at Fifty Seven, located at 712 S Santa Fe Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90021

http://fiftysevenla.electrostub.com/event.cfm?id=122547&cart

So with a nostalgic look back at their history as the Bolts, Island Apollo is poised to rise above the ocean floor and reach for the stars.

Island Apollo’s new social network links:

Facebook / Twitter / YouTube / Instagram

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Get To Know Guitarist Hailey Woodruff!

HaileyWoodruffPhoto_2

(PCM) Hailey Woodruff is a solo progressive metal guitarist, singer and composer out of Los Angeles. An alumnus of guitar and professional music studies at Berklee College of Music in Boston, she is a band within herself, writing and performing all instruments on her album, including drum programming that’s meticulous enough to emulate a live player.

While Hailey’s work doesn’t fall into progressive styles that are overtly technical and largely musician-friendly, she takes a milder, more responsive approach for mainstream and generic appeal, similar to that of Tool and Mudvayne, methodically working every guitar solo and riff to balance with her voice, and melting faces with an overall advanced sound unique to the genre.

To keep up to date with Hailey Woodruff, please visit:

http://www.haileywoodruff.com

https://www.facebook.com/haileywoodruff

https://www.youtube.com/user/HaileyWoodruffMusic

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Josh Turner Pulls No Punches With His Rougstock and Rambler Tour

XR7A0128

(PCM) Recently, country music superstar Josh Turner brought his down-home melodies to the Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA. Turner is in the midst of his Roughstock and Rambler Tour in support of his latest album, Punching Bag.

Josh hit the stage and pulled no punches, playing a sweet 16-song set that included big hits like “Your Man”, “Punching Bag”, “Time Is Love”, “Haywire”, and “Would You Go With Me”, as well as rare gems like “Backwoods Boy”. Turner closed out the set with the foot-stompin’ “Firecracker”. Josh Turner has one of the most distinct voices in country music today, and also has the ability to bring his big hits to life live on stage.

XR7A0086

Josh Turner exploded onto the country music scene in 2003. He inked a deal with MCA Records and released his first LP, Long Black Train. His sophomore effort, 2006’s Your Man, gave Turner his first two #1 singles. The album itself hit #2 on the Billboard Top 200 and #1 on Billboard Country Albums. Turner’s next two releases would also hit the Top 5 on the Billboard charts. His latest effort, 2012’s Punching Bag, debuted at #4 on the Billboard Top 200 and #1 on Billboard Country Albums.

The album’s lead single “Time Is Love” was the top country song of the year. Turner is reportedly working on new music for a follow-up, and he recently released his first book Man Stuff via HarperCollins Publishing. Throughout his career, Turner has been nominated for two Grammy Awards and seven CMA Awards.

XR7A0242 XR7A0268

Did you like this? Share it:

“Mandatory Fun” Scores Weird Al Yankovic His First No. 1 Album

-Weird_Al-_Yankovic(PCM) Hilarious artist Weird Al Yankovic has been delighting fans for the past weeks, releasing 8 parody videos in promotion of his new album, Mandatory Fun, and it looks like all the marketing has paid off!

Mandatory Fun, Weird Al’s fourteenth studio album, debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 making it the first number one record of artist’s 38-year long career.

Mandatory Fun sold over 104,000 units in its first week according to Nielsen SoundScan, doubling the sales of Weird Al’s previous studio album, Alpocalypse, during its first week.

Weird Al celebrated by tweeting the announcement to his 3.32 million twitter followers:

The album is also the first comedy album since 1963 to reach number 1 on the Billboard 200; Alan Sherman was the last comedian/parody artist to hold the title with his album My Son, the Nut.

Mandatory Fun includes tracks that parody recent hits by artists Robin Thicke, Imagine Dragons, Lorde, Iggy Azalea, and Pharrell as well as a few original tracks in the stylings of Cat Stevens, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, Pixies, and Foo Fighters.

The album, along with great sales, has received positive critical responses; the Los Angeles Times praised the album as “a stone cold masterpiece…parodying hit songs to create gut-busting laughter.”

Watch the video for “Word Crimes,” one of the videos released in the 8 days leading up to Mandatory Fun’s release that already has over 10 million views on YouTube, below and check out Weird Al’s official site here.

Also, PCM’s Danger Man, Lars Hindsley, interviewed the designer/animator for the Word Crimes video – Jarrett Heather, Check it out here.

Did you like this? Share it:

Pharrell Dropped “Come Get It Bae” Video Featuring Miley Cyrus

GIRL(PCM) From the Grammy-Award winning single with Daft Punk “Get Lucky” to his latest album G I R L, which earned the prolific producer an Academy Award nomination for the single “Happy” featured in Despicable Me 2, Pharrell is having a stellar year and he shows no signs of stopping.

Just today Pharrell debuted the video for his single “Come Get It Bae” featuring Miley Cyrus.

The video, which features women of all colors/ethnicities dancing it out in front of a backdrop of LA’s skyline, matches the fun high energy of “Come Get It Bae” with its hand-claps and dance inducing beat, making me want to get up and get down if you know what I mean.

Miley Cyrus, whose vocals are featured on the single, also appears in the video dancing and having an overall good time with Pharrell.

Pharrell is currently gearing up to embark on his European Dear Girl Tour, kicking off on September 9th in Manchester, England and wrapping on October 16th in Paris, France.

Check the video out below and visit Pharrell’s official website here!

Did you like this? Share it:

SBTRKT Announces New Album, Drops New Single “New Dorp, New York”

(PCM) UK producer SBTRKT (pronounced “subtract” for the uninitiated) delighted the music world when he announced his new album Wonder Where We Land and dropped the single “New Dorp, New York” on Tuesday.

“New Dorp, New York” is an ode to the Big Apple, featuring New York native Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend.

 

Wonder Where We Land follows SBTRKT’s self titled debut album from 2011 which received generally positive reviews, earning the 42nd spot on Pitchfork’s “Top 50 Albums of 2011.”

SBTRKT’s announcement follows the release of Transitions, a three part series of instrumental 12-inches released on Young Turks back in March.

SBTRKT also recently released the track “Temporary View” featuring singer Sampha just last month.

Watch the teaser trailer for Wonder Where We Land, being released on September 23, 2014 on Young Turks, below!

 

Did you like this? Share it:

The Story Behind the Weird Al Word Crimes Video with Designer & Animator Jarrett Heather

Weird Al Yankovic's Word Crimes Designed and Animated by Jarrett Heather

Weird Al Yankovic’s Word Crimes Designed and Animated by Jarrett Heather

(PCM) Jarrett Heather has been a dedicated lifelong “Weird Al” Yankovic fan, but when Al contacted Jarrett in November of 2014, the only back-story Al had on Jarrett was his own admiration of Jarrett’s work.

Jarrett had previously produced a music video in 2010 called Shop-Vac using a form of design called kinetic typography. Al had his own vision for a music video and believed Jarrett was a fit.

Over the course of almost a year the two then collaborated on that music video exclusively for “Weird Al” to be a part of his new album Mandatory Fun.

Unless you’ve been living under a virtual rock, you should be one of the ten million viewers (and still climbing) that has watched Word Crimes, a parody music video of 2013′s summer hit Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke.

This interview with Jarrett reveals some great trivia related to the Word Crimes video and of course Jarrett’s experience with “Weird Al”.

(Lars) How did you meet “Weird Al”?

(Jarrett) Al contacted me by email last November (2013). I was just minding my own business, and then “New message from Al Yankovic” was on my screen.

(Lars) Did you doubt it was him at first?

(Jarrett) No, I wasn’t skeptical at all.

(Lars) What was going through your mind? Did you ask him why he sought you out?

(Jarrett) I was very excited. I’ve been a huge fan of Al’s work since I was seven.

(Lars) Did Al approach you because you were a fan of his music or did he know of your artistic background?

Easter Egg - Jarrett throws in a shout out to local Twitter user

Easter Egg – Jarrett throws in a shout out to local Twitter user

(Jarrett) Al had seen a cartoon I made in 2010 called “Shop Vac”. After seeing that music video he decided I was “the best person in the world” at animating typography.

(Lars) What inspired the concept of the video?

(Jarrett) Al’s lyrics were the primary inspiration for the concept. I wanted the art in the video to show a contrast between new media and old media, with the textbooks and encyclopedias representing the “word police”, and the outmoded computer interfaces representing the “word criminals”.

After settling on that concept, I looked very, very closely at the video for Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines. Although that video’s Spartan production didn’t give me a lot to latch onto for parody, I still wanted to get a feel for the movement and the energy of the video–the length of the cuts, the staging, and the color grading. The look and feel of Blurred Lines informed a lot of design decisions on Word Crimes.

(Lars) You have a strong understanding of visual media. Where did you learn so much?
(Jarrett) I have no formal training in design or animation, but I’ve been doing graphic design professional (mostly for software interfaces) for over fifteen years. My background is in web publishing and software development.

(Lars) Tell me a little about your first planning session with “Weird Al”?

Easter Egg - Ethan age 7 - Jarrett's Son

Easter Egg – Ethan age 7 – Jarrett’s Son

(Jarrett) Al and I corresponded mostly by email. He brought a lot of specific ideas for visual gags, but he left the design of the movie in my hands.

(Lars) Do any of his gags stand out in the video? Which do you like most?

(Jarrett) The “doing good/well diagram” was Al’s idea. I like that one a lot because it’s a good visual representation of the grammar rule, and it’s a subtle reference to the television show 30 Rock.

(Lars) Are you one of those people that points out grammatical mistakes, lazy numerical shortcuts (i.e. sk8 instead of skate) and others outlined in the video Word Crimes to friends on Facebook or in tweets?

(Jarrett) Although I believe it’s important to express oneself clearly, I’m the last person who will belittle others for making little language mistakes. In fact, I look at the song as more of a send-up of “Grammar Nazis” than an admonishment of sloppy writing. The “Bachelor of Writing Good” visual gag is sort of a clue that this video is meant to amuse more than inform.

(Lars) I think a lot of people will be surprised to read that. Wouldn’t you say the song’s narrative implies shame?

(Jarrett) I’m not the songwriter, so thankfully it’s not for me to say. But as a fan of Al’s previous work, I suspect one should be cautious about assuming he’s planted his feet on one “side” of the joke. Is “Sports Song” an earnest anthem of athletic fandom, or is it making fun of sports fans? That depends entirely on whether the listener likes sports. I look at “Word Crimes” the same way.

(Lars) How many of your life experiences made it into Word Crimes?

(Jarrett) You’ll find a few specific personal references here and there, but I focused on telling the Word Crimes story, which was written by Al.

Weird Al, Jarrett Heather and Son Ethan

Weird Al, Jarrett Heather and Son Ethan

(Lars) How much did the initial plan to final product change during production?

(Jarrett) Surprisingly little, actually. When I look at the animatic, which was designed very, very quickly at the start of the project, I see that 95 percent of the big decisions made it through production. But animation is a very iterative process, so a few of the shots did evolve.

(Lars) Did Al storyboard it and present it to you or did you both work on that too?

(Jarrett) His initial suggestions were just written out. The movie has very few storyboards of any kind, in fact. I found it quicker to just compose shots directly in After Effects.

(Lars) Were you and Weird Al together when he first saw the final product?

(Jarrett) Sadly, no.

(Lars) It must have been an exciting moment for you to unveil that hard work. What was his reaction? Can you give people an idea?

(Jarrett) He has thanked me so many times in so many ways over the last six months; I can hardly recount them all. To say Al has been gracious toward me would be an understatement in the extreme. He has been an absolutely pleasure to work with from the start of the project through the launch of the record.

(Lars) What was the first “Weird Al” song you ever heard?

(Jarrett) I have clear memories of hearing Eat It for the first time at the age of seven. I was a very picky eater myself, so the song had a big impact on me.

(Lars) Al is known to have certain modesty about him. How assertive is he in getting what he wants from a concept?

(Jarrett) No detail of the movie was too small for discussion, and there was certainly some back-and-forth on a few ideas. We both had the same goal: To make the funniest video possible, so we never had much difficulty seeing eye to eye.

(Lars) Would you work with him again? If so, what would you like to try?

(Jarrett) I’d agree to another project in a heartbeat. I’d leave the subject matter up to him. Coming up with funny and interesting ideas for songs is very difficult.

(Lars) How long did it take you to complete the visual?

(Jarrett) I spent 500 hours, working nights and weekends over the course of three months.

(Lars) 500 hours is a long time. How does that compare to real world projects at work?

(Jarrett) In the time it takes to design, compose, animate and render a single shot for Word Crimes I can design and program and launch a complete, working website. This is sort of why I have so few animation projects to show off. The opportunity cost of a music video, from my perspective, is about 60 or 70 website projects.

(Lars) Any points of frustration? Was there a deadline?

(Jarrett) Yes, my contract with RCA/Sony specified a deadline of April 1st. I’m proud that I delivered the final animation on that date, but the audio soundtrack didn’t get mixed until the middle of May. Al tells me it’s the first time a vendor had completed his video before the song was recorded, so I suppose the deadline might have had some flexibility.

(Lars) At what point did you share it with Al?

(Jarrett) When Al first sent me the “demo” recording and timing master track, I told him I’d show him the initial designs within a week or so. After one day of work I’d already had 20 or 30 seconds of the animatic designed, so I sent him a rough render for feedback. We ended up corresponding nearly daily throughout the three-week design process.

Once I shifted gears into final production, I could only produce 10 or 20 seconds of footage a week, so we’d exchange email less often. But Al was intimately involved at every stage of production. I’m thankful for that. The video would not be nearly as good without all his input.

(Lars) You’ve gained a lot of notoriety with this video. Did you have any idea of the amount of views it would get on YouTube before it went up?

Weird Al Word Crimes animator Jarrett Heather leaves and Easter Egg with is own personal Emoticon Icon

Weird Al Word Crimes animator Jarrett Heather leaves and Easter Egg with is own personal Emoticon Icon

(Jarrett) Based on the subject matter I suspected it would spread in a viral way. The performance so far has been in on the higher end of my expectations.

(Lars) Have you had a lot of media contact you in response to the video?

(Jarrett) Yes. Radio, print, television, bloggers, podcasters, you name it. I don’t have a lot of interest in promoting myself, so I’m kind of just rolling with it.

(Lars) What’s that like?

(Jarrett) It’s a little stressful. I’m a shy person and I didn’t take this job because I was looking for a spotlight.

(Lars) This experience obviously benefited you on a number of levels from showcasing your talent to getting to know Al personally. What’s the biggest take-away in this project for you?

(Jarrett) My biggest take-away so far is not to underestimate myself. When you start a project like this, and you’re just looking at a blank canvas that stretches on for two hundred twenty-two seconds… it can be pretty daunting. Success was not guaranteed, and the prospect of disappointing one of my childhood heroes loomed over me in a very real way. Now that I can look back on it all and see just how much I was able to produce in a relatively short time, I’ll probably wield my powers with a little more confidence in the future.

(Lars) Jarrett, thanks for giving people some insight on this video. Will people see more from you? Do you have a YouTube channel or site you’d like to promote?

(Jarrett) Follow @spaceparanoids to get notified about future projects, but don’t expect a steady stream of animation from me.

(Lars) You’re employed already, but if another notable person needed your work, who would be top on your list?

(Jarrett) I’d love to combine more typography with musical comedy. If Tenacious D asked me to direct a video that would probably be a fun time. (Call me, Jack!)

Writers Note: I’ve known Jarrett Heather for 15 years. When I first met Jarrett, he had the rug pulled out from him by an unscrupulous employer but I knew inside a few minutes nothing could keep Jarrett down. We soon after worked together until Jarrett perused greater dreams in design across country in California.

Jarrett has a knack for understanding all things visual. Lessons he left me with were from simple to advanced such as the sixty percent white space rule, to the larger your company the smaller your logo.

Jarrett will never hurt for love in his trade, but should you ever have the opportunity to work with him, you will learn a lot. When he moved from Delaware to California I lost not only a mentor, but also a friend. If you are a creator, follow him on any social media.

Did you like this? Share it:

Kimbra Drops New Single “Miracle”

KimbraGoldenEcho(PCM) In anticipation of her new album The Golden Echo, out on Warner Bros. Records August 19th in the U.S., New Zealand pop songstress Kimbra dropped her latest single “Miracle” yesterday.

The Grammy-Award winning musician has already given fans a preview of her upcoming album through tracks “90s Music,” “Love in High Places,” and “Nobody But You,” the last of which features R&B crooner John Legend.

U.S. fans might be familiar with Kimbra from her huge hit from the summer of 2011 with Goyte, “Somebody That I Used to Know.”

The Golden Echo continues to showcase Kimbra’s fun and unique blend of music, straying somewhat from the poppiness of 2011′s Vows and delving into funk, disco, soul, hip hop, and everything in between.

The album, produced by Rich Costey (Fiona Apple, Interpol, The Shins), features 12 tracks with guest artists including Matt Belamy of Muse, Mark Foster of Foster the People, Dave Longstreth of Dirty Projectors, and Omar Rodriguez-Lopez of The Mars Volta.

Kimbra also announced her upcoming Fall U.S. tour, starting off in San Francisco on October 20th and wrapping up on November 9th in Massachusetts.

Listen to “Miracle” below, visit Kimbra’s official website, and pre-order The Golden Echo today!

Did you like this? Share it:

unSkinny Pop.com and Pop Culture Madness respect the principles of copyright. The images on this website, including, drawings, paintings, prints, or other two-dimensional work of art, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the artist who produced the image, the person who commissioned the work, or the heirs thereof.

It is believed that the use of low-resolution images of works of art qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law for both critical commentary and educational use.

If you are the owner(s) of any of these works, we will gladly link to your website or include specific copyright information, or work with you to insure proper credit for the information and creative content included on each page of the website.

Fair Use Checklist
Everything else © copyright 1999-2014 Pop Culture Madness, unless stated otherwise.

Privacy Statement: We will not sell, give or share any personal information, including e-mail addresses, of any of our visitors to anyone outside of Pop Culture Madness. com or our affiliated network sites. We do not accept any stealth or spyware advertisers or third party sponsors of such programs. Pop Culture Madness. com and affiliated sites do not send spam, offer get-rich-quick schemes, offer or suggest "enhancement" devices or medications via e-mail.

For purposes of Review, we often (usually) get samples, Reviews, get press access and other 'inside information.'
Take that into account when you read a positive (or negative) Review, on PCM or anywhere on the internet. We do not place stories up for payment unless it is a stated sponsor or a link that we believe will be helpful and relevant to our visitors.

PCM does use third-party advertising companies, such as google, to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies,
click here.

WordPress theme: Kippis 1.15